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Argentina

If you’re travelling to Argentina, our travel advice and updates give you practical tips and useful information.

Security Status

  • Normal precautions
  • High degree of caution
  • Avoid non-essential travel
  • Do not travel
  • Overview
  • Safety and Security
  • Local Laws and Customs
  • Natural Disasters and Climate
  • Additional Information
  • Embassy Contact

Overview

Overview

General COVID-19 Travel Advisory in Operation:

Avoid non-essential travel until further notice:

The Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade advises against all non-essential travel overseas until further notice. This includes Great Britain but does not apply to Northern Ireland. It also includes all travel by cruise ship.

If you are currently travelling outside of Ireland:

Flight restrictions and route cancellations are happening on a daily basis worldwide and there is no guarantee that air routes will continue to operate. For this reason, where commercial flights are still an option, we recommend that people who wish to do so make arrangements to return to Ireland as soon as possible.

We are working with airlines to show maximum flexibility to those passengers who need to change their existing flight arrangements. Where commercial flights are no longer available, we are working side-by-side with our international partners to identify alternative options where possible.

It may not be feasible or possible for everyone who wants to travel back to Ireland to do so in the short term. We ask Irish citizens remaining abroad to make decisions that safeguard their health and well-being and that they follow local public health and safety requirements.  We ask that they remain in close contact with family, friends and their local Irish Embassy or Consulate. 

We know that this is a stressful situation for citizens and our embassy network is working around the clock to provide people with all the information and assistance that we can, bearing in mind the situation is unfolding across multiple countries and is not one under our control. 

What to do on entering Ireland from abroad:

The Irish Health Authorities require anyone coming into Ireland, apart from Northern Ireland, to restrict their movements on arrival for 14 days. Check the Irish Health Service COVID-19 Advice Page for full information on these requirements. This includes Irish residents. Exemptions are in place for providers of essential supply chain services such as hauliers, pilots and maritime staff.

Where to go for more information:

We continue to make updates to our online travel advice for over 200 countries and recommend that you download our TravelWise App and follow us on Twitter. If abroad you should register with your local Irish Embassy or Consulate and regularly check their website and especially their Twitter accounts for details of any local public health measures and travel restrictions.

Security Status

Avoid non-essential travel.

Latest Travel Alert

COVID-19 Novel Coronavirus

In the last days, emergency responses to the COVID-19 crisis in many countries in Latin America and the Caribbean have included restrictions of flights from Europe; restrictive new quarantine arrangements in Central America as well as restrictions affecting admissions of Irish people already travelling in the region to other countries in Latin America.

There are no direct transatlantic flights to Ireland from the region. Therefore, given the uncertainty around transatlantic travel options into Ireland we strongly recommend that Irish travellers make early arrangements to travel out of /from the region.

Moreover, we very strongly advise against any further travel into the region until the COVID-19 crisis has been contained there.

A number of cases of novel coronavirus (COVID-19) have been confirmed in Argentina.

The Argentine authorities have announced additional measures to combat the spread of the virus including travel restrictions and quarantine requirements.

On 19 March, Argentina introduced a nationwide mandatory self-isolation from midnight on Thursday 19 March to midnight on Tuesday 31 March. However, during this period, people will be able to leave their homes to buy essential supplies such as medicines or food in their local area.

If you have already purchased a flight ticket, you should be able to travel to the airport to leave the country. Please make arrangements with your accommodation providers for transport to the airport and carry a copy of your flight confirmation with you.
Please contact us on buenosairesembassy@dfa.ie or through the DFAT call centre +353 (0) 1 6131733 if you have a query.

On 12 March, the Argentina President announced a 30 day suspension of international flights to and from Europe, the United States, China, Japan, South Korea and Iran to Argentina. This suspension came into force on 17 March.

We recommend contacting your airline or tour operator and following the advice of the Argentine Ministry of Health.

The government has also imposed a mandatory 14 day self-isolation period for anyone travelling to Argentina from any of the areas listed above, in order to limit the spread of the virus. For further information, please visit the Argentine Ministry of Health website.

However, the Argentine Government have advised that any traveller from the affected areas who is currently self-isolating, as set out on the Argentine Ministry of Health website and above, that does not have novel coronavirus symptoms can return to their country of origin.

On 17 March, the government announced that domestic flights and long distance trains and buses will be cancelled from midnight on 19 March to midnight on 24 March. Local buses and trains in metropolitan Buenos Aires will only allow seated passengers from 19 March to 31 March. Individual provinces across the county have also introduced additional restrictions. 

These measures may be imposed at short notice and specific details may change rapidly, including where and to whom they apply to and for how long. All travellers should stay informed of measures being taken by authorities in the areas they are travelling to. We recommend contacting your airline or tour operator and following the advice of the Argentine Ministry of Health.

If you are in Argentina, you should monitor developments regularly and follow the advice of local authorities.

Be alert to common signs of infection: respiratory problems, fever, cough, shortness of breath and breathing difficulties. Seek medical advice if you experience these symptoms.

HSE medical advice to protect yourself from getting COVID-19 is below.

Do:

• wash your hands properly and regularly with soap and water or an alcohol-based hand rub
• cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve when you cough and sneeze
• put used tissues into a bin and wash your hands

Don’t:

• touch your eyes, nose or mouth if your hands are not clean.

Additional information on COVID-19 can be found via the following links:

Argentine Ministry of Health

HSE

HPSC

ECDC

World Health Organisation

Emergency assistance

The best help is often close at hand so if you have problems, start by talking to your local contacts, tour operator representative or hotel management.

We suggest you learn as much as you can about Argentina before your trip from travel agents, tour operators and guide books. The best help is often close at hand so if you have problems when you’re in Argentina, try talking to your local contacts, tour operator representative or hotel management.

To report emergencies, contact the police, an ambulance, or the fire department by dialling 911 from any phone except in Cordoba, Mendoza, Iguazu, Tucuman, and Tierra del Fuego provinces, in which you need to dial 101 for emergency services.

Contact the Embassy

If there is an emergency, or if you need help and advice, you can contact the Irish Embassy in Buenos Aires.

If you phone outside of working hours, leave us a message giving:

  • Your name
  • The nature of your problem
  • Where you are now
  • Your contact details (mobile phone number or phone number of where you’re staying)

We regularly monitor these messages and one of our staff members will be in contact with you.

You can call our Embassy in Buenos Aires on +54 11 4808 5700, or our emergency consular line in Dublin on +353 1 408 2000

Our tips for Safe Travels:

  • Purchase comprehensive travel insurance which covers all your intended activities.
  • Add an alert for your destination within the Travelwise App.
  • Register your details with us so that we can contact you quickly if there’s an unforeseen crisis like a natural disaster or a family emergency.
  • Follow us on twitter @dfatravelwise for the latest travel updates.
  • Read our ‘Know Before You Go’ guide.

Safety and Security

Safety and security

Social unrest

The political situation in Argentina is reasonably stable but there can be occasional outbreaks of social unrest. You may encounter groups of demonstrators (piqueteros) blocking major roads into and out of the capital, causing delays and possibly a change in route.

Always keep yourself informed of what’s going on around you by monitoring local media and staying in contact with your hotel or tour organiser. Avoid demonstrations and public gatherings, which can sometimes turn confrontational.

Terrorism

Although the threat from terrorism in Argentina is low, there is still a global risk of indiscriminate terrorist attacks, which could be against civilian targets, including places frequented by tourists and expatriates.

Crime

Crime remains relatively low in Argentina but you should take sensible precautions.

Petty theft

You should be particularly careful in Retiro bus station in Buenos Aires, on the Buenos Aires underground transport system and in the city of Mendoza, where there has been a lot of pick-pocketing and bag-snatching.

A common scam in Buenos Aires is for one thief to spray a sauce on you, which prompts another thief, posing as an innocent passer-by, to come to your aid and clean your clothes, while also stealing your possessions.

More violent crime has been reported in the area around San Telmo and La Boca in Buenos Aires and you should avoid carrying valuables in these areas.

Counterfeit banknotes

There are quantities of counterfeit banknotes in circulation in Argentina. You can visit the Argentine Central Bank website to see what to look out for in a counterfeit note.

Taxi drivers, particularly those working from the airport, have been known to accuse customers of handing over fake money and handing them back a fake note that they already have in their possession. When paying drivers, be extremely careful and consider taking note of the serial number of the bill before you pay the driver.

If you’re hailing a taxi on the street, make sure you only hail a radio taxi; they have a logo on the rear passenger door and often a light or sign on the roof of the car.

Reporting crime

If you’re a victim of a crime while in Argentina, report it to the local police immediately. And you can contact us at the Irish Embassy in Buenos Aires if you need help.

Driving

If you’re planning to drive in Argentina, you should be extremely careful. Road safety standards vary throughout the country; respect for speed limits and traffic signals is patchy and manoeuvres by fellow road users can be unexpected.

Crime against car users, particularly when stopped at traffic lights, is a growing danger and we advise you to keep your windows closed and doors locked at all times, particularly when you’re driving in the city.

If you want to drive:

  • Bring your international driving license and make sure you have adequate and appropriate insurance
  • Driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs is against the law and you risk being detained, fined or banned from driving if caught
  • Keep your vehicle doors locked and your bags kept out of sight to prevent opportunistic bag-snatching if you’re stopped at traffic lights

If you’re hiring a vehicle, we advise you not to hand over your passport as a form of security. If you’re allowing your passport to be photocopied, keep it in your sight at all times.

Check that you have adequate insurance and read the small print of the vehicle hire contract (particularly any waiver that will come into effect if the vehicle is damaged).

Local Laws and Customs

Local laws and customs

Local laws and customs

Remember, the local laws apply to you as a visitor and it is your responsibility to follow them. Be sensitive to local customs, traditions and practices as your behaviour may be seen as improper, hostile or even illegal.

Illegal drugs

Illegal drug use (no matter what the drug) carries stiff penalties, including fines and long prison terms.

Natural Disasters and Climate

Natural disasters and climate

Earthquake

Argentina is in an active earthquake zone and there have been sporadic earthquakes in western sections of the country along the border with Chile. If you’re travelling to or living in Argentina, make sure you know what to do in the event of an earthquake.

 

Additional Information

Additional information

Entry requirements (visa/passport)

If you are unsure of what the entry requirements for Argentina are, including visa and other immigration information, ask your travel agent or contact the nearest Embassy or Consulate of Argentina.

You can also check with them how long your passport must be valid for.

Health

Check with your doctor well in advance of travelling (8 weeks) to see if you need any vaccinations for Argentina.

There is a risk of Zika Virus (a dengue-like mosquito-borne disease) in Central and South America and the Caribbean. Irish Citizens especially those with a weakened immune system or women who are pregnant or trying to become pregnant are advised to follow guidance available on the website of the Health Protection Surveillance Centre (HPSC) at http://www.hpsc.ie/A-Z/Vectorborne/Zika/.

Embassy contact

Embassy Contact

Outside office hours, for genuine emergencies involving Irish citizens, which cannot wait until the next working day, please call +54 9 11 5945 7483.

You may also wish to contact the Duty Officer at the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade in Dublin on +353 1 408 2000.

Embassy of Ireland
Edificio Bluesky
6th Floor
Avenida del Libertador 1068
Recoleta
Buenos Aires
Argentina

Tel: +54 11 4808 5700
Fax: +54 11 5787 0802

Monday to Friday 9am to 1pm

Contact us